Stanley Brinks & The Old Time Kaniks

Stanley Brinks & The Old Time Kaniks

27.99

Stanley Brinks (aka André Herman Düne) returns with the new double album Vieilles Canieques / Nouvelles Caniques after 2016’s Record Store Day Release Turtle Dove. He’s joined once again by the Norwegian folk collective The Kaniks, this time stripped back to a two piece of fiddle and banjo (“The Old Time Kaniks”). Eschewing a traditional recording studio, Brinks took The Kaniks to a remote island outside the small town of Egersund in south west Norway. Over the course of week of midnight sun, midnight swims and midnight beers on their isolated rocky island, living and recording in the only building on the island, the (now un-manned) mid 19th century Vibberodden lighthouse, Stanley Brinks and The Kaniks recorded the double album of modern day folk tales of love, loss and mischief. Brinks is renowned for his unique antifolk style: both playful and suggestive, insightful and entertaining. His mastery of storytelling, presented in both English and in French on these albums, introduces you to the free spirited world of Brinks’ life as a touring musician. His fondness for calypso and the unusual provide the perfect foil to The Kaniks’, whose folk instrumentation and country and bluegrass influences take this double album to a joyous place Brinks hasn’t been before in his extensive back catalogue. Stanley Brinks was born in Paris, France, in 1973. He studied a bit of biology and worked as a nurse for a while. Half Swedish, half Moroccan, strongly inclined to travel the world, he soon began spending most of his life on the road and developed a strong relationship with New York. By the late 90s he’d become a full time singer-songwriter – André Herman Düne – as part of three piece indie-rock band, Herman Düne. Several albums and Peel sessions later and after a decade of touring Europe, mostly with American songwriters such as Jeffrey Lewis, Calvin Johnson and early Arcade Fire he settled in Berlin. The early carnival music of Trinidad became a passion, and in the early 21st century he became the unquestioned master of European calypso, changing his name to Stanley Brinks. Under this moniker he has recorded more than 100 albums, collaborated with the New York Antifolk scene on several occasions, recorded and toured with traditional Norwegian musicians, and played a lot with The Wave Pictures.

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